The Soy Debate
Black Cohosh Ginkgo Biloba Dong Quai Ginseng Red Clover Soy Vitex Macafem
Black Cohosh
Black cohosh grows in the woods of eastern North America
Ginkgo Biloba
Traditionally used in Chinese medicine for thousands of years.
Dong Quai
Dong Quai is often referred to as "the female ginseng"
Ginseng
The Chinese word "rénshén" means "man root" in English
Red Clover
Originates from Asia, parts of Northern Africa, and Central Europe
Soy
Traditionally used in the Orient as a source of protein and medicine
Vitex
Vitex agnus-castus is also called chaste tree
Macafem
Originates from the Andean mountains of Perú

The Soy Debate

When menopause rears its ugly head, many women seek natural alternatives such as soy to relieve their symptoms. Despite its glowing properties, why does this controversial bean continue to remain a subject of hot debate?

Read on to find out about the risks and side effects of using soy.

Is Soy Safe?

Showing up in everything from margarine to canned tuna, soy´s popularity is evident. But the side effects of soy tell a different story. These include:

Infertility

The Soy DebateStudies have shown high levels of soy protein may decrease fertility. A report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that high levels of soy can increase the length of the menstrual cycle while decreasing follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and lutenizing hormone (LH).

Cancer

Although not confirmed, studies suggest ingredients in soy may increase the risk of breast cancer in some women. At low concentrations, genistein, the main isoflavone in soy, is believed to stimulate the growth of estrogen receptor breast cancer cells.

Hyperthyroidism

Products rich in soy may increase the risk of thyroid disease. Opponents of soy believe soy is a toxin for thyroid patients while others consider it safe if taken in moderation.

Infant Formula

The Soy DebateIsoflavones in formula have been found to affect body weight in infants. Based on individual body weight, experts estimate infants fed exclusively soy formula receive the estrogen equivalent of approximately 5 birth control pills daily. This can cause girls to develop quicker and boys to underdevelop.

Soy and Menopause

For women dealing with menopause, soy has been shown to work extremely well, moderately or not at all. Soy isoflavones (plant compounds that mimic estrogen) have been closely studied and revealed to relieve a wide variety of perimenopause and menopause symptoms including weight loss, heart health, bone health, improved nail, skin and hair health and decreased severity of hot flashes and night sweats.

Beside diet and stress relievers, soy is considered the next-best-step to relieving hot flashes. Yet this doesn´t mean soy works for every woman. The causes of hot flashes and night sweats can differ in menopause and 20 per cent of women are negatively affected by the protein in soy.

Despite its many benefits soy does have many risks. It is always advisable to consult a health care professional before using soy in your diet. Click here to find out more about the use of soy during menopause.

Main Sections
Macafem
Is an Andean plant regarded as one of the best treatments for menopause symptoms because of it boosts the endocrine system.
Dong Quai
Is an Asian plant that has been used for thousands of years to treat gynecological problems, blood disorders, and as a sedative.
Ginkgo Biloba
Is a popular and ancient Chinese herbal remedy used to improve circulation, mental performance, and menopause symptoms.
Ginseng
Is a root widely used by Chinese, Koreans and Native Americans as a preventative treatment and to increase vitality.
Soy
Is a healthy, low-fat source of protein and is used as treat menopause because of its high amount of phytoestrogens.
Red Clover
Is a variety of Clover with a high nutritional value and it's widely used as an immune-booster and menopause relief, but it has some side effects.
Black Cohosh
Is a phytoestrogenic herb from eastern North America and it is used as a supplement to treat several illnesses, including menopause symptoms.
Vitex
Used since roman times to help women with hormonal imbalances, but pregnant women should avoid it.
Which herb should women try? Today women are looking for relief from their menopause symptoms with herbs. Phytoestrogenic herbs and non-estrogenic herbs are good in relieving menopause symptoms, but recent studies show that non-estrogenic herbs have no side effects because they help the body to produce its own hormones instead of introducing hormones like the phytoestrogenic ones. Learn more about non-estrogenic herbs for menopause.
The Soy Debate