Are There Any Risks Associated With Ginseng?
Black Cohosh Ginkgo Biloba Dong Quai Ginseng Red Clover Soy Vitex Macafem
Black Cohosh
Black cohosh grows in the woods of eastern North America
Ginkgo Biloba
Traditionally used in Chinese medicine for thousands of years.
Dong Quai
Dong Quai is often referred to as "the female ginseng"
Ginseng
The Chinese word "rénshén" means "man root" in English
Red Clover
Originates from Asia, parts of Northern Africa, and Central Europe
Soy
Traditionally used in the Orient as a source of protein and medicine
Vitex
Vitex agnus-castus is also called chaste tree
Macafem
Originates from the Andean mountains of Perú

Are There Any Risks Associated With Ginseng?

Are There Any Risks Associated With Ginseng?Used for thousands of years to improve memory and overall well-being, ginseng is also widely used to treat the symptoms of menopause. A popular natural healing herb, Ginsengīs numerous benefits include increasing energy, enhancement of memory loss and its ability to increase libido.

However, for women that choose to take Ginseng, itīs always advisable to consult with your doctor or healthcare professional to learn about its possible dangers. Read on to find out more about the risks associated with taking Ginseng.

What Should I Know Before Taking Ginseng?

Although a very well-tolerated herb when ingested orally, some common side effects of taking Ginseng include headaches, gastrointestinal problems, allergies and abnormal blood sugar levels. Because Ginseng is a stimulant it can also cause anxiety, agitation and disturbances in sleep such as insomnia for some individuals.

Individuals with the following conditions should take caution before consuming Sinseng:

Hormone sensitive conditions - Ginsenosides within ginseng act similar to estrogen and may worsen conditions sensitive to estrogen causing cancer cells to proliferate. These may increase the risk of breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis and uterine fibroids.

Surgery - For individuals undergoing surgery, Ginseng can interfere with blood sugar levels and control before and after surgery. It is recommended to stop taking Ginseng at least 2 weeks prior to surgery.

Pregnant or Breast-Feeding Women- A chemical within Panax Ginseng has been linked to possible birth defects. However, not enough is known about the safety of Ginseng and its effects during breast-feeding.

Allergies - Although rare, some users have developed allergic reactions to Ginseng. Symptoms included difficulty breathing, swelling of the lips, face or tongue, tightening of the throat and hives.

Are There Any Risks Associated With Ginseng?Diabetes - The Asian variety of Ginseng has been shown to lower blood glucose levels, particularly in people with diabetes. Diabetics should take extra precaution with Asian ginseng if taking additional medications or herbal supplements (i.e. bitter melon) to decrease blood sugar levels.

When used in correct dosages, Ginseng has minimal side effects, but these should never be underestimated. It is recommended that Ginseng not be taken for prolonged periods. Consult with your doctor before adding Ginseng to your daily diet. Additional consultation with a specially trained herbalist may also be beneficial.

Click here to find out more information about treatments for menopause symptoms.

Main Sections
Macafem
Is an Andean plant regarded as one of the best treatments for menopause symptoms because of it boosts the endocrine system.
Dong Quai
Is an Asian plant that has been used for thousands of years to treat gynecological problems, blood disorders, and as a sedative.
Ginkgo Biloba
Is a popular and ancient Chinese herbal remedy used to improve circulation, mental performance, and menopause symptoms.
Ginseng
Is a root widely used by Chinese, Koreans and Native Americans as a preventative treatment and to increase vitality.
Soy
Is a healthy, low-fat source of protein and is used as treat menopause because of its high amount of phytoestrogens.
Red Clover
Is a variety of Clover with a high nutritional value and it's widely used as an immune-booster and menopause relief, but it has some side effects.
Black Cohosh
Is a phytoestrogenic herb from eastern North America and it is used as a supplement to treat several illnesses, including menopause symptoms.
Vitex
Used since roman times to help women with hormonal imbalances, but pregnant women should avoid it.
Which herb should women try? Today women are looking for relief from their menopause symptoms with herbs. Phytoestrogenic herbs and non-estrogenic herbs are good in relieving menopause symptoms, but recent studies show that non-estrogenic herbs have no side effects because they help the body to produce its own hormones instead of introducing hormones like the phytoestrogenic ones. Learn more about non-estrogenic herbs for menopause.
Are There Any Risks Associated With Ginseng?