Dong Quai 101: The Best Forms to Use During Menopause
Black Cohosh Ginkgo Biloba Dong Quai Ginseng Red Clover Soy Vitex Macafem
Black Cohosh
Black cohosh grows in the woods of eastern North America
Ginkgo Biloba
Traditionally used in Chinese medicine for thousands of years.
Dong Quai
Dong Quai is often referred to as "the female ginseng"
Ginseng
The Chinese word "rénshén" means "man root" in English
Red Clover
Originates from Asia, parts of Northern Africa, and Central Europe
Soy
Traditionally used in the Orient as a source of protein and medicine
Vitex
Vitex agnus-castus is also called chaste tree
Macafem
Originates from the Andean mountains of Perú

Dong Quai 101: The Best Forms to Use During Menopause

Dong Quai 101: The Best Forms to Use During MenopauseIn recent years, taking herbal supplements to treat the symptoms of menopause has become a popular alternative to HRT, an often costly and risky option for women. Dong quai, a herb native to Japan, Korea and China, is a mild sedative and stress reliever containing phytoestrogens, which mimic the properties of estrogen when introduced to the female body.

Dong quai has been used to treat menopausal symptoms such as mood swings, hot flashes and vaginal dryness.

Top 5 Ways to Use Dong Quai

Dong quai can be taken in a variety of forms to help treat your menopausal symptoms. Keep reading below to learn more about ways to introduce Dong quai into your lifestyle.

Dong Quai Tea
Drinking Dong quai tea 2-4 times daily is a fast and convenient way to reap the benefits of this phytoestrogenic herb. In addition to helping relieve your menopausal symptoms, herbal teas also contain antioxidants and help bolster your immune system.

There are plenty of tea companies that offer ready-made packets of Dong quai tea. The University of Maryland Medical Center suggests preparing homemade Dong quai tea by putting one teaspoon of the herb in hot water, allowing it to steep covered for 5-10 minutes for leaf or flowers and 10-20 minutes for roots.

Dong Quai Dried Herb
Dong Quai 101: The Best Forms to Use During MenopauseAs a dried herb, Dong quai can be consumed raw by steaming the root for a few minutes and cutting it into thin slices. The slices should be dried in a warm place for approximately 24 hours and then stored in a dark jar. Eat 1-2 pieces daily.

According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, dried Dong quai root can be boiled or immersed in wine before consuming.

Dong Quai Capsules
As a powdered herb available in capsules, Dong quai´s dosage can vary depending on the brand. Be sure to check the recommended dosage on the manufacturer label for safety.

Dong Quai Root Tincture
Dosage varies depending on brand. Popular recommendations are to place 15-30 drops of Dong quai root tincture in water or juice 1-3 times daily.

Dong Quai in Topical Varieties
Topical preparations of Dong quai root can be applied directly to the skin. 10 to 15 drops of diluted essential oil may be used to treat skin irritations. Dong quai has also been used in combination with damiana, saw palmetto, green oats and gotu kol to create topical creams that boost libido.

Now that you know more about ways to use Dong quai, learn more about Dong quai’s benefits and side effects. Click here for more information about Dong quai and menopause.

Main Sections
Macafem
Is an Andean plant regarded as one of the best treatments for menopause symptoms because of it boosts the endocrine system.
Dong Quai
Is an Asian plant that has been used for thousands of years to treat gynecological problems, blood disorders, and as a sedative.
Ginkgo Biloba
Is a popular and ancient Chinese herbal remedy used to improve circulation, mental performance, and menopause symptoms.
Ginseng
Is a root widely used by Chinese, Koreans and Native Americans as a preventative treatment and to increase vitality.
Soy
Is a healthy, low-fat source of protein and is used as treat menopause because of its high amount of phytoestrogens.
Red Clover
Is a variety of Clover with a high nutritional value and it's widely used as an immune-booster and menopause relief, but it has some side effects.
Black Cohosh
Is a phytoestrogenic herb from eastern North America and it is used as a supplement to treat several illnesses, including menopause symptoms.
Vitex
Used since roman times to help women with hormonal imbalances, but pregnant women should avoid it.
Which herb should women try? Today women are looking for relief from their menopause symptoms with herbs. Phytoestrogenic herbs and non-estrogenic herbs are good in relieving menopause symptoms, but recent studies show that non-estrogenic herbs have no side effects because they help the body to produce its own hormones instead of introducing hormones like the phytoestrogenic ones. Learn more about non-estrogenic herbs for menopause.
Dong Quai 101: The Best Forms to Use During Menopause